Posts Tagged “jobs for over 50”

 The Drum, 2 Septembert 2014

Emily Millane, Research Fellow
The Drum Unleashed, 2 September 2014

Our retirement income system is now skewed so heavily towards the wealthy in our society that we’re not just at risk of going nowhere, we risk going backwards, writes Emily Millane.It’s always slightly unnerving when the airline you’re flying with says it needs to take some time to redistribute the weight on the aircraft before you take off. Visions of a plane dragging one wing along the runway with sparks flying everywhere tend to ensue.

The fact is, the distribution of an aircraft’s weight needs to be calibrated in such a way that the thing can get off the ground, and back onto it, safely. And so it is with our tax and transfer system.

Distribute it right and you’re off; get the distribution wrong and society is on a fast track to nowhere.

Per Capita’s recent report, The Entitlement of Age, argues that, together, increasing longevity and rising inequality are making Australia’s retirement income system unsustainable. The structure of the system, combined with the distribution of benefits, is skewed so heavily towards the wealthy in our society that we’re not just at risk of going nowhere, we risk going backwards.

Notwithstanding differences as a result of race, education and socio-economic status, on average Australians have very high life expectancies. Indigenous Australians are the notable exception to this average

Per Capita’s findings show that we are living longer than previously estimated, largely as a result of declining mortality rates. We need to plan for longer lives, and we need incomes to pay for them.

The current system will not deliver retirement security, even if Australians work until they are 70. Some Australians will move into older age well funded but women, the low-paid and those in insecure work will not.

Per Capita’s research, using four different scenarios, shows that a woman retiring in 2049 who has children and works a mix of full-time and part-time hours will have only 60 per cent of the superannuation balance of a man the same age as her, a deficit of $358,000.

The way in which superannuation is taxed compounds the income insecurity faced by vulnerable groups. The concessional rate of tax on superannuation income relative to ordinary income, known as “superannuation tax concessions”, favours those with higher incomes.

If the Government is successful in removing the Low Income Superannuation Contribution, people on low incomes will pay more on their superannuation contributions than they do on ordinary income.

More than 50 per cent of the superannuation tax concessions go to the wealthiest 20 per cent Australians. At the same time, Per Capita’s annual tax survey showed that 42 per cent of people on incomes of $200,000 and above consider that the best way to pay for longer lives is through further superannuation tax concessions.

As detailed by the ACTU recently, the IMF has found that Australia foregoes more through tax expenditures than all other advanced economies it analysed. The largest areas of expenditure are housing and superannuation tax concessions.

What does all of this tell us? It tells us that people on the highest incomes have come to see the beneficial tax treatment of their superannuation as an entitlement. It tells us that any effort to change the shape of tax on superannuation to make it fairer will require political courage. It also tells us that change is necessary.

The Government’s proposed alterations to the age pension, particularly in respect of indexation, will mean that it does not provide a safety net from poverty. It is those same groups that are disadvantaged by the superannuation system that will face further financial precariousness as a result of these changes – the women, the low-paid and those engaged in insecure work.

Australia’s spending on the age pension is going up; no one is arguing with that. However, as the Treasurer found out with his comments in respect of the fuel excise, it’s the proportion of income that matters. Australia spends about 3.5 per cent of its GDP on the age pension compared with an average spend by other wealthy counties of 7.8 per cent of GDP.

So what of it? What does it matter that some people will have overseas holidays and theatre shows to look forward to in later life, while others will sit at home watching daytime TV? Or that some people will see medical specialists while others will put off seeing the GP?

It matters because these questions go to the issue of human dignity. Australians are entitled to incomes sufficient for a dignified life.

More broadly, these questions go to the issue of what sort of society we understand Australia to be. Whether we are all on this journey together, or whether it is OK that there is an increasing distance between people in economy, and the class of people who haven’t seen the back of a plane in years.

Brent Peppercorn and his grandmother Linda Goldsmith, at right, who have been touring NSW with the Living Well Navigator meet Wollongong's Susan Barnett. Picture: GREG TOTMAN

Brent Peppercorn and his grandmother Linda Goldsmith, at right, who have been touring NSW with the Living Well Navigator meet Wollongong’s Susan Barnett.

Almost half of NSW baby boomers have had to face age discrimination, according to an NRMA survey.

The survey was carried out as part of the research into a new website – Living Well Navigator – directed at the over 50s.

Forty per cent of the respondents said they have experienced age discrimination themselves or knew of someone who had.

In addition, 37 per cent of people over 50 have little confidence they would be treated fairly in a job interview.

Peter Khoury from the NRMA said this was concerning, especially given the federal government’s plan to push back the retirement age to 70.

Mr Khoury said businesses needed to adjust to the realities that come with the ageing baby boomer population.

“There’s a lot of debate about the working age being extended, which means a lot of Australian companies need to be prepared for the fact that their workforce is going to be older than it used to be,” Mr Khoury said.

With more than half of the NRMA’s membership over the age of 50, the Navigator site aims to provide support for those looking to get back into the workforce.

“The Living Well Navigator site assists older workers by providing information on how to get jobs and volunteering information as well as hosting a jobs board to connect older workers with age-friendly employers,” said NRMA local director Michael Tynan.

“The site aims to bust common myths and stereotypes on ageing. Those north of 50 have comprehensive knowledge, are highly skilled, active and make valuable contributions to our society.”

The website provides a wide range of information for the over-50s – including work, health, travel and supported and independent living.

Source:  Illawarra Mercury

Published 20 August 2014 12:05, Updated 21 August 2014 07:32

What Gen Y, Gen X and Baby Boomers want at work - and just wait for Gen Z

Tamara Erickson says managers should encourage Gen Y workers to innovate.

If you think managing Generation Y workers is tricky, just wait until the next generation walks through the door.

Generational expert Tamara Erickson says children aged four to 17 have been heavily influenced by the global financial crisis, the environmental movement, mobile technology and easy access to information on the internet. That is translating into a generation of savers who feel empowered to take action and aren’t very keen to work for big companies.

“They will make very interesting consumers and employees,” Erickson, who was listed as one of the World’s Top 50 Business Thinkers in 2013, says. “We have a generation of kids coming on who would like to be entrepreneurs if they could.”

The United States-based consultant has written three books on the different generations in our workplaces and is working on a fourth book on the next generation of workers, which she calls the “ReGeneration”.

Speaking to The Australian Financial Review before her keynote speech at the Australian Human Resources Institute national convention on Wednesday, she argues that each generation’s attitude to work makes perfect sense given childhood influences – but we rarely cut other generations any slack.

Erickson acknowledges there are plenty of things that influence our preferences at work, from life stage to gender and personality. But she argues our generation has a big impact on our “knee-jerk reaction” to things. “There’s really good evidence that show some of our generational biases follow us throughout our lives.”

Erickson is a follower of Swiss developmental psychologist Jean Piaget who argued that children’s experiences from age 11 to 15 have a lasting impact on the way their perceive and interact with the world. This helps explain the differences between generations, from traditionalists (in their 70s) who created many of our hierarchical organisations to those about to join the workforce.

Keeping Gen Y interested

Older executives tend to think that Gen Y workers don’t want to “pay their dues”, Erickson says. “Frankly, [Gen Y] don’t want to do some grubby job for five years in the hope it pays off.” She argues it is not that the generation is lazy and entitled, but it is influenced by the September 11 terror attacks and the wars that followed, as well as other acts of violence like the Port Arthur massacre. All this taught the generation that random things can happen and it is best to live life to the fullest now.

Managers should accept that is a ­reasonable way to think and start catering to it and encouraging them to innovate, she says. “One way to make even menial tasks more challenging is to let them [Gen Ys] figure out how to do them,” she says.

Options appeal to Gen X

Erickson urges companies to change traditional career paths to attract and retain Gen Xs. These workers in their 30s and 40s saw climbing divorce rates, corporate collapses and job lossess in their formative years and they are focused on being self-reliant, having options and having back-up plans, she says. Offering lateral moves around a company appeals to Gen X as it broadens their skill set and options, she says.

Boomers want cyclical work

With an ageing population, companies need to be able to keep the best of their workers aged in their 50s and 60s, Erickson argues. The key is offering flexible work. Her surveys have revealed that the most popular form of work for this generation is cyclical fulltime work (such as working on a project for a few months a year) rather than the usual part-time option. This gives boomer workers the freedom to travel. This type of work is slowly growing more popular in the US. For example Mitre, a US consultancy, has “reserves at the ready” – former full-time highly trained staff who can be called back in for big projects, Erickson says.

Source:  BRW

Posted by Judy Higgins on 2 July 2014

When it comes to CVs, less is more says Judy Higgins, co-founder of website Older Workers.

Applying for a job, if done properly, is a time consuming task. And, sending out generic applications en masse will risk your brand, your reputation and the likelihood that you’ll be seriously considered for a job.

Employers and HR staff can pick a generic application and cover letter very quickly and will disregard it just as quickly. Our employers tell us if the applicant hasn’t got the right attitude with their application, and is not prepared to put in an effort, then that will likely carry through to their work. On that basis they won’t consider that applicant.

The message from employers and HR staff is clear: take the time to tailor your CV and cover letter for the particular job you are applying for; and address the specifics in the job advert in terms of ‘must have’ skills and experience. Also, if there is a name and contact number, give the person a call and talk to them about the job, so that you are very sure about the needs of the company and how you can show you are the best applicant.

I understand if you are with Centrelink there is a requirement to apply for a minimum number of jobs within a certain period of time, and in some instances this could lead to quantity over quality. But if you are serious about applying for specific jobs, then you must put in the time and effort to ensure you give yourself every opportunity to sell your skills. More is not better when it comes to applications, particularly in a buyer’s market – which it is at the moment.

The importance of a tailored CV should never be underestimated. Jobseekers need to quickly realise their CV is the tool that will, or won’t, give them the opportunity to get face-to-face with the employer. Quality wins over quantity every time when it comes to job applications.

 

Source:   https://www.mynrma.com.au/living-well-navigator/work-volunteering-blogs/cvs-quality-versus-quantity.htm